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History & News

A WARSHIP NAMED FOR THE GREEN RIVER SERVED IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR

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October 23, 2019
A navy warship named the USS Green River was built and saw service during World War II, the Sweetwater County Historical Museum said in an article circulated on Wednesday.
The Green River (LSM(R)-506) was classified as a “Landing Ship Medium (Rocket),” an amphibious assault ship designed to support troops during landing operations. Commissioned in May of 1945, she was 203 feet long and displaced about 1,200 tons. LSM(R)s of her class were crewed by six officers and 137 enlisted men, and armed with a 5"/38-caliber gun, four 40mm and eight 20mm guns, four 4.2" mortars, and 20 continuous-loading 130mm rocket launchers. 
Ships of the Green River’s class were named after rivers in Illinois, Kentucky, Washington, Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming, according to the Naval History and Heritage Command.
The Green River was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific Theater, but the war ended before she saw any action. She was decommissioned in 1946, and stricken from the naval register in 1958.
For more pictures, and fascinating history, follow the museum on Facebook.

MUSEUM SEEKING HELP WITH OLD NAVY PHOTOGRAPH

View the photo here

October 17, 2019

The Sweetwater County Historical Museum and the New Studio are seeking help from the public in obtaining information about a photograph taken nearly a century ago.

The photo, lately discovered in New Studio files, is a shot of seven United States Navy Clemson-class destroyers and their crews taken in San Diego Bay on April 29, 1922. The ships are USS Meyer, USS McCawley, USS Henshaw, USS Moody, USS Doyen, USS Laub, and USS Sinclair.

The photograph, shown here, features particularly the Henshaw, Moody, and Doyen, with the Moody in the center of the shot.

It is believed that a Sweetwater County man was likely serving aboard one of the destroyers at the time the photograph was taken, and the New Studio recently contacted the museum to request help in identifying him.

“We hope that someone will recognize the photo or know about a family member who served aboard one of the destroyers in the photo in the early 1920s,” said Brie Blasi, the museum’s director.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the museum in Green River at (307) 872-6435, or via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

SWEETWATER COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM; RELIANCE TIPPLE INTERIOR IS EXTREMELY DANGEROUS

reliancetipple

October 15, 2019

The Sweetwater County Historical Museum is once again issuing a warning about the dangers of going inside the Reliance Tipple, north of Rock Springs.

The Tipple is a familiar Sweetwater County landmark. Built in 1910 and used until 1936, it was used to sort coal mined in the Reliance area for shipment.

The Tipple is on county property and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is fenced and posted and the museum maintains a video surveillance system inside the structure. The presence of several trespassers inside the Tipple recently activated the surveillance system and their images were recorded and turned over to the Sweetwater County Sheriff’s Office for follow-up investigation.

The Tipple’s exterior may be toured, but structural conditions inside it are highly unsafe.

The museum stressed that while visitors to the Tipple are welcome - as described on the the “Tour Wyoming” website at

www.tourwyoming.com/…/sightseeing-and-…/reliance-tipple.html , no one should go inside the structure. A 3d digital scan can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFuriKDeSoE.

HISTORIC ROCK SPRINGS BUSINESS CELEBRATES A CENTURY-LONG LEGACY

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October 12, 2019

A special ribbon-cutting ceremony by the Rock Springs Chamber of Commerce at an iconic Rock Springs business was celebrated on Friday.

The New Studio is the oldest still-operating photographic studio in Rock Springs. It opened its doors in 1919 under the ownership of Charles August, a Greek immigrant, and Frank Nakako, who came to the United States from Japan at the age of 24.

Nakako left the business in the early 1920s and August continued to operate it until his retirement in 1945, when his sons Mike and Anthony took over. In 1976 the Augusts sold the Studio to long-time employee Oliver “Bud” Tebedo, who in turn sold it to Diane Butler, a Studio employee for 16 years, in 1994. After a total of 42 years with the business, Butler sold it to Rj Pieper and Angela Thatcher this year, on its 100th anniversary.

In 2015 the Sweetwater County Historical Museum acquired the New Studio’s extensive collection of photographs and negatives, ensuring that a century of priceless photographic records will be safely preserved for future generations.

For more pictures, and fascinating history, follow the museum on Facebook.